This Might Be the Strongest AND Lightest Material Ever Seen in 3D Printing

This Might Be the Strongest AND Lightest Material Ever Seen in 3D Printing

By Tyler Koslow

One of the most scientifically mind-blowing materials ever discovered, graphene (an allotrope of carbon) has been praised for having an unbelievable combination of material characteristics, including low density, top-notch mechanical properties, thermal stability, and even electrical conductivity. In fact, graphene aerogel is one of the lightest materials ever discovered, reportedly weighing seven times less than air…But these great qualities only really hold true in graphene’s original 2D material composition, which are greatly diminished when graphene is made three-dimensional. That is until now.…

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Source: 3dprintingindustry.com
This Might Be the Strongest AND Lightest Material Ever Seen in 3D Printing

Harvard’s 4D Printed Flowers to Pave Way for 4D Printed Human Tissues

Harvard’s 4D Printed Flowers to Pave Way for 4D Printed Human Tissues

By Michael Molitch-Hou

When I interviewed Voxel8 CEO Jennifer Lewis last year, she told me that she didn’t want me to conflate her research with her commercial work, namely the multi-material, electronics 3D printer she developed at Voxel8.  This meant that my questions regarding 4D printing and bioprinting would have to be reserved for a separate interview.  While the exact date for that interview is yet to be determined, her team at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard John A.…

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Source: 3dprintingindustry.com
Harvard’s 4D Printed Flowers to Pave Way for 4D Printed Human Tissues

NIH Grants $141K to Develop 3D Printed Device to Deliver Anti-Cancer Drugs

NIH Grants 1K to Develop 3D Printed Device to Deliver Anti-Cancer Drugs

By Michael Molitch-Hou

With medicine being a field to most immediately disrupted by 3D printing technology, now the medical community is getting behind the technology to create new solutions to old problems. This is particularly evidenced by news that Florida Atlantic University has just received a grant from the National Institute of Health to develop a 3D printed stent to treat esophageal cancer.

While it is the eighth most common form of cancer, the treatment of esophageal cancer has so far proven difficult, with 50 to 60 percent of patients ineligible for surgery due to late tumor detection or metastases that cannot be removed surgically. …

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Source: 3dprintingindustry.com
NIH Grants 1K to Develop 3D Printed Device to Deliver Anti-Cancer Drugs

Northwestern’s Low-Cost Tech Turns Rust into 3D Printed Iron

Northwestern’s Low-Cost Tech Turns Rust into 3D Printed Iron

By Michael Molitch-Hou

In order to bring down the cost of metal 3D printing, researchers and industrial R&D divisions are working on new approaches to the technology that forgo lasers and electron beams for other methods altogether.  While XJet, in Israel, will be introducing its metal inkjetting to the world, hopefully, sometime soon, Northwester University scientists have their own metal inks that they say they can 3D print similarly to fused filament fabrication. We’ve actually covered the work of Ramille Shah, assistant professor of materials science and engineering in the McCormick School of Engineering and of surgery in the Feinberg School of Medicine, in the past, but, in a recent study published in the journal Advanced Functional Materials, Shah and her team describe the process in even greater depth.…

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Source: 3dprintingindustry.com
Northwestern’s Low-Cost Tech Turns Rust into 3D Printed Iron

New Ceramic 3D Printing Method Able to Withstand over 2,500°F

New Ceramic 3D Printing Method Able to Withstand over 2,500°F

By Tyler Koslow

Throughout the brief and ever-shifting history of ceramic-based 3D printing, many of the field’s innovators have found success with printing in ceramic material by using a FDM-like process, which works by building up the design layer by layer. When it comes to high-performance ceramics, however, companies like Lithoz and Prodways use photopolymerization processes. Malibu, California-based HRL Laboratories has taken this to a whole new level, using their stereolithography-like approach to 3D print ceramic materials with amazing industrial properties. The development and benefits behind this newly derived ceramic 3D printing method were first detailed in the academic journal Science, and is being touted as a new process that can definitely withstand the heat.…

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Source: 3dprintingindustry.com
New Ceramic 3D Printing Method Able to Withstand over 2,500°F